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Published on June 18, 2016 By Frogboy In Everything Else

When running an Internet business, trust is one of the most valuable commodities a business has.  That’s why I was so surprised to discover that Teleflora seems to operate on what appears to be an unscrupulous business model.

For my wife’s parent’s big wedding anniversary she ordered this:

image

What they actually got was this:

image

Besides the fact that it only had a handful of the roses, the most ridiculous part is that the little white flowers they included rather than the ones in the picture are actually those little white flowers you see in the field.  I.e. it appears they just took whatever flowers they had on hand and ran outside to the field and picked some of those little white flowers.

The flower order was over $100. So this wasn’t some cheap flower arrangement.

Ok, you might say, people make mistakes.  Call them up and ask for a refund. So my wife does and their response, after leaving her on hold for half an hour, was a 25% discount on future orders. That’s it. 

And that is what makes it a scam in my opinion. It appears that Teleflora’s business model appears to be to rely on people just tolerating this kind of thing.  The no-brainer thing would have been to give her a refund and keep her future business. 

Look closely at those two pictures and add that they won’t give my wife a refund and it’s hard not to conclude that part of their business model is to simply not deliver what they promise and pocket the difference.

There’s a lot of legitimate web-based flower deliver services.  Teleflora does not appear to be one of them.


Comments
on Jun 18, 2016

Same happened to me.

The story you get? "That picture is the basic appearance. The actual bouquet/arrangement and vase vary with availability in the local floral store." Same offer: 25% off future orders...until I pointed out with a screen shot that was their usual offer. 

I sent the flowers from a company based in Spain to someone in Israel...but I got a partial refund because I included pictures.

Oh...the company name? FloraQueen. Not recommended.

on Jun 18, 2016

I don't think any of those outfits actually verify that the florist they use is sending the actual bouquet as advertised.

on Jun 19, 2016

Ok, you might say, people make mistakes

It's strange but whenever these kinds of mistakes happen it's always against your favour. Which is why I doubt it's just a mistake. This is methodical to increase profit, which makes it fraud. 100$ is not a tiny amount, and just consider this happens to every 2nd customer they have...

on Jun 19, 2016

Maiden666

every 2nd customer they have...
Wishful thinking, probably more like 80 % of them...

on Jun 19, 2016

Having used several online floral delivery services, I seem to remember all of them have a fine-print disclaimer that what's delivered might vary from the design shown based on local availability, blah, blah.  If it's a scam, they are all scammers.

on Jun 20, 2016

It's worth calling a local place directly and letting them know you are local  . . . that way they also know you can make a local fuss as needed.

on Jun 20, 2016

The whole "you should call a local florist" thing is very annoying.

If you're ordering for someone in a very distant location (Alaska, BFE Michigan, etc.) it makes no sense to try to do some what? Google map search of local florists? Come on, that's silly.  The whole point of these services is that they are supposed to vet the local florists and take care of that. 

 

on Jun 20, 2016

When we stopped dealing with our neighbors (main street) for our shopping, we embraced the abyss.  "Corporations' milk the 'masses.'  Yes, we hope the corporation will 'vet' the products.  But there is way too much money to be made 'off' skimming the multitudes.  When word finally gets out to enough people, the perps walk free, bcuase its a corporation that did it - not actual flesh and blood people.  Until we create a system that does not let the people who control corporations walk away from the corps crimes, this kind of behavior (like Teleflors's) will continue.  Buy local, my dears.

on Jun 21, 2016

The picture you show is quite clearly a fine example of BAIT & SWITCH.  They make small claims court for us masses to sue for triple damages.  The court proceeding becomes a public record and to which these sort of "business pros" can't sue for liable.

Their customer service reps could care less if you were given a $25.00 floral arrangement in exchange for $100.  They have a script they are forced to follow and that's all you will ever get from them.

They must have studied in the "SHC/DT School of Shareholder Profits First and Screw the Customer" Business School.  I think Martin Shkreli was it's first Valley Dick Torian.  Kinda brings a tear to my eyes.

I love ya Frogboy.

on Jun 21, 2016

Really... It's not a Calculated Evil Corporate Exploitation of the Masses thing.  They can't rip you off unless you choose to purchase.

There are trade-offs involved in everything, folks.

on Jun 22, 2016

ElanaAhova

When we stopped dealing with our neighbors (main street) for our shopping, we embraced the abyss.  "Corporations' milk the 'masses.'  Yes, we hope the corporation will 'vet' the products.  But there is way too much money to be made 'off' skimming the multitudes.  When word finally gets out to enough people, the perps walk free, bcuase its a corporation that did it - not actual flesh and blood people.  Until we create a system that does not let the people who control corporations walk away from the corps crimes, this kind of behavior (like Teleflors's) will continue.  Buy local, my dears.

If my wife's parent's are in BFE Alaska, what "neighbor" would you propose she deal with?

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