Brad Wardell's site for talking about the customization of Windows.

My wife and I recently came across a show that referenced a person who had the inability to visualize images in their minds. 

My immediate reaciton was, “Of course they can’t, nobody can.  We call those hallucinations.”  I thought it was absurd to suggest that people could just conjure up an image in their minds. 

Turn out, I’m the defective one: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/23/science/aphantasia-minds-eye-blind.html?_r=0

So in my case (which for 45 years I assumed was the same for everyone else), I can’t close my eyes and visualize say an apple.  If I see someone and close my eyes I won’t recall anything I just saw.  I couldn’t identify their shirt.   Unless I explicitly memorize it, I won’t remember a visual detail (like what my son’s glasses look like – I have no idea). 

To me, you close your eyes, it’s dark.  Sort of “Duh, of course.” 

I was aware that I could not easily recognize people.  Put one of my friends at the mall here and I wouldn’t recognize them easily.  But until the show we watched, I had no idea that people could actually visualize an image in their mind.  For me, it’s pretty mind blowing.


Comments (Page 1)
on Feb 09, 2016

So what happens when you dream? Is it just dark?

on Feb 09, 2016

Borg999

So what happens when you dream? Is it just dark?

Not dark. Just very abstract.  Flickers of color.

on Feb 09, 2016

Wait, people can do this while they're awake?  I kid.  Well, sort of, I've never been able to do it, I just figured out that I wasn't a visual learner when I was still in elementary school.

 

The only thing confusing me here is that scientists just discovered this.  I thought this was the whole point of some people being visual learners, who can see and store that imagery for recollection, and people who can't and learn best either by hearing, or doing.  Recalling imagery while I'm awake is as likely to happen as sprouting wings.

on Feb 09, 2016

Has a publicity designer i have to do it every days along with my team ,my objectives depending what clients want,  i project in mind so then i put on paper so then ower group decide what fit or not to the month project.

But yes not all people can put objects or figures or diverse environments on the mind so then draw it.

 

I have a friend that always draw what he see in his imagination, the result is always what you see in real life its what he draw.

 

My teacher taught me a good way.

Imagine the place you like in a quiet place without noise.
View all the details as you can and draw , if you can manage to draw what you visualize you have art inside you, if you can not you stay just by wanting this job.

 

But i think with some train all can do it test it and you will be surprise after some attempts.

on Feb 09, 2016

"Visionary thinker"....

The reason not everyone is/can be an Architect [or at least a half-decent one] is whether or not they can 'visualize'.

Better still if you can 'think' your way through a design/structure as if it were a 3D VR tour.

Eons ago my maths teacher revealed he was totally colourblind only saw in greyscale.  That too was an eye-opener [no pun].

 

Fun part is...if you're good at visualizing it all becomes entertaining if you're smoking pot....

on Feb 09, 2016

Wow, this is awesome. I mean, these things are super-interesting. Since i feel like all my memories are more or less visual in nature, i find it incredibly difficult to even imagine how can it be possible to have any memory at all without it for someone.

I suppose there is direct connection between this and why i was always shit at math/algebra. If i cant visualize it in my mind, i am screwed. And abstract stuff like math is notoriously difficult to visualize.

on Feb 09, 2016

Timmaigh

And abstract stuff like math is notoriously difficult to visualize.

One of my 'party tricks' was to do long division in my head ...

on Feb 09, 2016

I can do long division in my head, as long as I can memorize the equation.  Suffice it to say the length of the equation is somewhat drastically short at this point.

on Feb 10, 2016


Fun part is...if you're good at visualizing it all becomes entertaining if you're smoking pot....

I used to do that. Imagining all sorts of stuff behind closed eyes was, to some extent, exhilarating. Forty years later...not so much. Good thing I still have an active imagination. Weird but active.

on Feb 10, 2016



Quoting Timmaigh,

And abstract stuff like math is notoriously difficult to visualize.



One of my 'party tricks' was to do long division in my head ...

Like Rainman?

 

on Feb 10, 2016

Timmaigh

Like Rainman?

I am old enough to remember a time before calculators ....where the only options were pen and paper....shuffle stick...or using your head...

on Feb 10, 2016

Yo Jafo, ya forgot the slide rule.

on Feb 10, 2016

@Frogboy,

You are not the only one. Welcome to the club.

Turn out, I’m the defective one

Defective? According to who? Just different.

 

on Feb 10, 2016


Yo Jafo, ya forgot the slide rule.

We called 'em 'shuffle sticks' ...so nope, didn't forget...

on Feb 10, 2016

 




Defective? According to who? Just different.

 

Agreed. The article states people with aphamtasia just have different ways of processing information. Like one of the questions mentioned in the article about knowing how many windows are in your home. The first thing that pops in my mind are images of what they look like in each room. The people with aphantasia  still arrive at the answer regardless. Their process works. I'd like to know how their process works. It's pretty fascinating whenever we learn the things we take for granted as universal experiences simply aren't.

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